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13.11.2020

Borsen, Сopenhagen

Børsen is a 17th century stock exchange in downtown Copenhagen. The historic building is located next to Christiansborg Palace, the seat of the Danish Parliament, on the island of Slotsholmen . Börsen, a popular tourist attraction, is best known for its characteristic spire, shaped like the tails of four dragons woven together and reaching a height of 56 meters.

Built during the reign of Christian IV in 1619-1640, the building is considered a leading example of Dutch Renaissance style in Denmark. It is a protected building for preservation purposes.

Börsen was planned by Christian IV as part of his plan to strengthen the role of Copenhagen as a center of trade and commerce in Northern Europe. The site on the north side of the promenade, which connected Copenhagen with the new market town of Christianshavn, which was planned on reclaimed land off the coast of Amager . The King commissioned Lorenz van Stenwinkel to design the new building, but shortly afterwards Stenwinkel died. This task was then handed over to his brother Hans van Stenwinkel.

First it was necessary to prepare the site, because the embankment has not yet stabilized. Construction of the building began in 1620 and was largely completed in 1624, except for the spire (installed in 1625) and details of the eastern gable (completed in 1640). The building had 40 commercial offices on the first floor and one large room on the top floor. In the late 1620s the building was used as a market.

In 1647, Christian IV sold the building to the merchant Jacob Madsen for 50 000 Danish rigsdillers . Later, Friedrich III bought the building from the widow Madsen.

The interior of the building was renovated in 1855. In 1857, Friedrich VII sold the building to Grosserer-Societetetet for 70 000 rigsdalers.

Until 1974, the Danish Stock Exchange was located in this building. In 1918, unemployed anarchists attacked Börsen, an attack that was included in Danish history books as a "storm on the stock exchange. The building was restored by Nicholas Eigtvedev in 1745.

UP