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08.02.2021

Rhoneston Hoard

Fifteenth century hoard found at Glenlus Sands, Wigtownshire, in 1956, a remarkably similar hoard was discovered in early 1961 at Ronston, Nithsdale, Dumfriesshire. The new hoard, which is slightly smaller, may have been buried somewhere five times the year before, around 1490, because unlike Glenlus, it did not contain any James IV coins. Both hoards contained long runs of 1451 billon pence, several packs, and several Scottish and English pennies and halves.

A discussion of the value of the two holdings taken together has been published,
so this paper consists mainly of a Ronston coin catalog with a preface of some specimens and a few Scottish and English pennies and halves.

The seven English coins are fairly evenly distributed over the half century to 1465. With one old coin from 1351. Scottish pennies, by contrast, begin with two of James II's distinction in 1451 and later, and the remaining four belong to the late 1470s and early 1480s. But they are earlier than the last coins; it seems, so is Glenlus,
Ronston contains a small money element, numerically the largest, which was added at the time of the final concealment before the more valuable saving element. The English coins are
are individually interesting, except that #4, a heavily trimmed Henry VI penis, had new cross-shaped endings engraved on the reverse to give the misleading impression that parts of the design had not been cut off.

The six stamps of James II and James III include one new obverse.
The Ronston contains a small money element, numerically the largest, which was added for the time of the final concealment before the more valuable savings element. 

Twelve second James II coins and fifty-one James III coins include some new varieties, but the number of individuals in this hoard and in Glenlus shows that the picture we now have of these billon issues is less incomplete than it could be.

It has been suggested that only from Glenlus, number 10 is an Edinburgh penny of James II's second coin, with a coronet in one quarter of a cross on the reverse, and in other groups of three pellets, which includes figure.

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