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10.02.2021

Ryther Hoard

This hoard of 817 coins dates from the very beginning of the Tudor era, just a couple of years after the end of the War of the Roses, circa 1487. Many of the coins were minted at York, which was an important mint that produced large quantities of silver during the medieval period. It was administered by the archbishop. The coins reflect the character of the war with coins from the reigns of Henry VI and Edward IV. There is also a coin minted at York during the reign of Edward III.

The jug is unglazed with a single handle. Contains the Reiter hoard. Jennings, S. 1995 (Rther Hoard Report): This nearly complete small jug is a typical example of one of the most famous products of the Humber ware industry. Humber products were produced at several locations in the Humber basin - Cowick, Kelk, Holme on Spalding Moor, and possibly York - and the products from all the famous production centers are visually extremely similar. Small unglazed jugs such as this one were usually made very crudely, raw and unfinished, and almost never glazed. Any glaze found on them is usually incidental and comes from other vessels in the kiln. Because of their size, these jugs are usually called "drinking jugs," but scholarly analysis, as well as manuscript illustrations, clearly show that they were also commonly used as men's urinals. The frequency with which these "drinking jugs" are found, both in excavations and as chance finds, suggests that they were cheap even by the standards of cheap medieval pottery and may well have been considered disposable objects.

 Drinking jugs of this type were made in the second half of the fourteenth century and were common in the fifteenth century. This example probably corresponds to the date of the hoard rather than the old pot that was on hand. Their popularity declined with the appearance of superior German pottery in the late fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, and to date there is little evidence of production of these jugs after the early sixteenth century.Drinking jugs "are found both in excavations and as chance finds, suggesting that they were cheap even by standards of cheap medieval pottery and may well have been considered disposable items. Drinking jugs of this type were made in the second half of the fourteenth century and were common in the fifteenth century. 

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